Segregated weights classes unnecessary

Students in Kris Henry fifth block white bench press. Weights classes were coed until this year when they switched to gender based sections.

Jaqui Carey

Students in Kris Henry fifth block white bench press. Weights classes were coed until this year when they switched to gender based sections.

Jaqui Carey, Writer

In previous years, athletic development, also known as weights, has been a mixed class with both boys and girls. This year, they have changed it so that there were boys only and girls only classes.

This change was not welcome among students. The class lost the rivalry that drove many students to push themselves to their goals.

“There seems to be more competition when we lift with boys and girls together rather than separate,” sophomore Destiny VanGordon said.

While the change is not the best, the teachers admire the change to the course.

“We have made it boys only and girls only classes to better meet the needs of our students,” weights teacher Amy Stubblefield said.

The problem with the teacher’s hopes of the class is that not everyone is meeting their needs. They are lacking the motivation they need to really excel in the course.

Without a co-ed class, girl and boys alike are losing their interest in the activity.

“The boys motivate me to lift more and improve myself,” junior Roshea Daniels said.

Not only did the classes change, but the workouts have too. Many female students say that the new workouts do not feel as “intense” as the workouts they have done in previous years. The male workouts however, were kept consistent with the prior classes.

Changing workouts due to gender causes less intensity and less interest by students.

“Since it’s all girls, class seems more chill,” sophomore Dominique  Moritz.

Although some do not like the new change, others are grateful for it.

“I do not have to worry about girls lifting the same or more weight than me,” sophomore Jasper Earls said.

Not only is that idea ridiculous, but many other students disagree. The benefit of the few should not trump that of the majority.

“Just because two out of 20 girls are uncomfortable, doesn’t mean there needs to be a change,” Moritz said.

Changing the course was unnecessary, inconvenient and a waste of everyone’s time. Students are not pleased with the results and are waiting for the course to change back to the old way.